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Can I Get a Florida Nursing Degree if I have a criminal record?

Can You be A Nurse with A Misdemeanor Theft

Introduction

There is one huge concern hovering over your mind if you don’t have a spotless background yet have great expectations of attending nursing school. Is it possible to go into nursing school if you have a criminal offense?

There are a variety of schools and clinical programs to choose from, each with its own set of entrance requirements. It all relies on wherever you intend to travel, what area you’re in, and what kind of offense you’ve committed. Further in this article, we will help you understand whether or not you can become a nurse with misdemeanor theft.

Can You be A Nurse with A Misdemeanor Theft

There is no one answer to this question. You can become a nurse with such a record and you cannot as well. I know that sounds confusing, so let me clear that up for you.

That would be a choice made by the administration. You can now only be interrogated about convictions, not arrests, in most jurisdictions. There are two obstacles to overcome: the school’s curriculum and licensure. If you’re thinking about going to school, you might want to do some research beforehand.

Keep in mind that if this is your first violation, you may be able to have it expunged or removed from your record. You’d have to look at state laws. There are instances when a specific period must have passed before you may apply for anything.

Several factors contribute to the decision taken by management. We have discussed those in detail below.

Factors Contributing Towards the Decision

Several factors have to be looked at to adequately determine whether or not you will be able to become a nurse with misdemeanor theft. A few of the important factors have been discussed below:

1- Intensity of the Misdemeanor

First and foremost, think about the sort of misdemeanor you have on your history. As compared to smaller theft, misdemeanors such as driving while intoxicated, common assault or harassment, and minor sex offenses will be more impossible to miss. Nursing school admissions committees must ensure the safety and security of patients you will contact with. Notwithstanding your criminal violation, being completely honest about your charges will aid you in your efforts to become a nurse.

2- The Time Since the Misdemeanor was conducted

The timing of your offense will also affect your chances of getting into nursing school. It’s probably more forgiving if it happened 15 years ago and you haven’t been changed since. Whenever you register to some colleges, you may be subjected to a background investigation. Some states’ background checks, on the other hand, only go back a certain number of years. As a result, if the offense happened a long time ago, it could not even show up.

3- Rules of Your State

Examine your state’s regulations on criminal offenses and nursing before applying anyplace. Because each state has its own set of laws, it’s critical to know what they are and if they would prevent you from enrolling in nursing school if you have a misdemeanor.

4- Rules of the Nursing School

Inspect out the particular rules for every nursing school you’re considering in enrolling, now that you’re knowledgeable of your country’s rules. Regardless of the intensity of the misdemeanor that you have, check the admissions standards to determine if you will be admitted. If you’re concerned that your history investigation will prevent you from being admitted, look into colleges that don’t need a background check before admission. You might also call the institution you plan to participate and arrange for an admissions appointment to explain your infraction. Explaining the scenario firsthand can allay any fears the school may have while also demonstrating your character.

Alternate Routes to Take if You Cannot Get in a Nursing School

Regrettably, one bad decision can set you on a lengthy path of misery. There is, nevertheless, a ray of hope at the end of the darkness! Only because your state’s nursing regulations prohibit you from enrolling in nursing school if you have a misdemeanor does not indicate that other states’ rules are equally severe.

Practicing as a travel nurse, on the other hand, maybe a viable alternative. Having said that, it’s vital to remember that the nursing field is very demanding. Based on the circumstances of your offense, it may prevent you from being evaluated for a job since there are so many other medics competing for the same profession who do not have a criminal record.

Bottom Line

An expungement and closure of your criminal record are useful in getting a nursing degree or work as a nurse, irrespective of whether you will be compelled to reveal an erased conviction. While certain criminal convictions will preclude you from becoming a nurse, many others will not. Being implicated in a minor theft has little to no possibility of damaging your nursing application; nevertheless, you must inform them of your involvement. Hiding a criminal conviction might put you in a terrible situation.

Certain minor charges, according to the Board, have minimal influence on an individual’s ability to properly practice nursing and represent the low danger of damage to the public. In such situations, the Board considers it acceptable to close the case without taking any action against the individual.

Final Words

There are no criminal convictions that will prevent you from becoming a nurse. Any felony or misdemeanor convictions that are substantially linked to the qualifications, responsibilities, or obligations of a licensee may be grounds for denial by the Board. Having a criminal past does not automatically rule you out of running for the job. If you’re looking for a job in the healthcare field, you’ll almost certainly be required to reveal any previous or ongoing criminal convictions. Being honest about your past reflects favorably on your character.

About Rachel

Hi my name is Rachel; a registered nurse. I graduated from one of the best nursing programmes and have been working in the medical field for 10 years. As a licensed practical nurse, I understand the plight that comes with the job. While I enjoy taking care of patients, I understand the long working hours that nurses have to deal with. We spend majority of the shifts walking around the medical centre making sure all patients are taken care of and this requires a lot of work and energy on the feet. https://bestnursingshoes.net has been created to help nurses from different parts of the world find the perfect shoes to reduce the strain on your feet and posture and make the job much easier.

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